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  • Gene Bank and the Traditional Breeds Meat Marketing scheme, which benefit the wider livestock industry.
  • The Trust has demonstrated the value of rare native breeds in non- intensive sustainable systems of livestock production.
  • The Trust has carried out or sponsored research in a variety of studies which are relevant to all breeds of livestock. These include lipid analysis (cholesterol content) and evaluation of carcase quality, ease of parturition trials for cattle and sheep, genetic distance studies, development of linear assessment models for beef cattle, and scrapie resistance in sheep breeds.
  • The Trust co-operates with other organisations, such as CLA, NFU, National Trust and English Nature, in areas of common interest, and participates actively in the Biotechnology for Biodiversity Platform and the Grazing Animal Project.
  • The Trust has an Approved Centre scheme to approve those farm parks that contribute to the conservation of rare breeds and maintain high standards for both animals and visitors.
  • The Trust needs your support to ensure the security and promotion of Britain's rare and minority breeds. Join now

History and Heritage Rare native breeds are an integral part of British history. Soay sheep have been found here for thousands of years; Bagot goats were brought in by the returning Crusaders; Dorking poultry were here already when the Romans arrived, and White Park cattle were valued even earlier as a special breed in the Celtic and Druidic culture. They are as much a natural part of the British countryside as old churches, castles and monuments.

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